Introduction of MQC

Latest reply: Dec 22, 2018 01:04:22 235 2 11 1

Introduction of MQC


Modular QoS Command-Line Interface (MQC) allows you to classify packets based on packet characteristics and specify the same service for packets of the same type. This allows different types of packets to be provided differentiated services.

As more services are deployed on a network, service deployment becomes increasingly complex because traffic of different services or users requires different services. Using MQC configuration, you can classify network traffic in a fine-grained way and specify the services provided to different types of traffic according to your needs. MQC enhances serviceability of your network.


MQC Entities

MQC involves three entities: traffic classifier, traffic behavior, and traffic policy.

  • Traffic classifier

    A traffic classifier defines a group of matching rules to classify packets.
Traffic classification rules
LayerTraffic Classification Rule
Layer 2
  • Destination MAC address
  • Source MAC address
  • VLAN ID in the tag of VLAN-tagged packets
  • 802.1p priority in the tag of VLAN-tagged packets
  • VLAN ID in the inner tag of QinQ packets
  • 802.1p priority in the inner tag of QinQ packets
  • Protocol field in the Layer 2 header
  • Matching fields in ACL 4000 to ACL 4999
Layer 3
  • DSCP priority in IP packets
  • IP precedence in IP packets
  • IP protocol type (IPv4 or IPv6)
  • TCP-flag in TCP packets
  • Matching fields in ACL 2000 to ACL 3999
  • Matching fields in ACL6 2000 to ACL6 3999
Others
  • All packets
  • Inbound interface
  • Outbound interface
  • Matching fields in ACL 5000 to ACL 5999 (user-defined ACLs)
  • The relationship between rules in a traffic classifier can be AND or OR. The default relationship is AND.
    • AND: If a traffic classifier contains ACL rules, a packet matches the traffic classifier only when it matches one ACL rule and all the non-ACL rules. If a traffic classifier does not contain ACL rules, a packet matches the traffic classifier only when it matches all the rules in the classifier.

    • OR: A packet matches a traffic classifier as long as it matches one of rules.

  • Traffic behavior

    A traffic behavior defines an action for packets of a specified type.

  • Traffic policy

    A traffic policy binds traffic classifiers and traffic behaviors, and then actions defined in traffic behaviors are taken for classified packets. In Figure 1, a traffic policy can be bound to multiple traffic classifiers and traffic behaviors.
                                       fig_dc_cfg_qos_003105.png

MQC Configuration Process

Figure 2 outlines the MQC configuration process in the following steps:
  1. Configure a traffic classifier. The traffic classifier defines a group of matching rules to classify traffic and is the basis for differentiated services.

  2. Configure a traffic behavior. The traffic behavior defines a flow control or resource allocation action for packets matching the rules.

  3. Create a traffic policy and bind the traffic classifier to the traffic behavior in the traffic policy.

  4. Apply the traffic policy to system, interface, or VLAN.

Figure 2 MQC configuration process 
                                                                                   fig_dc_cfg_qos_003101.png

  • x
  • convention:

Tanzania163
Tanzania163 Created Dec 3, 2018 07:42:25
Good flow  
4am
Created Dec 22, 2018 01:04:22 Helpful(0) Helpful(0)

The device can forward data in best-effort mode and selectively forward packets. This is a complete forwarding rule.
  • x
  • convention:

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