Usage scenarios of indoor distributed APs

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Indoor distributed APs are applicable to medium-scale coverage scenarios that are subject to coverage holes or important public places such as hotels, airports, and conference halls. They are not applicable to scenarios that require high capacities.

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Usage scenarios of outdoor APs
Outdoor APs are applicable to open outdoor areas with high user densities, such as squares, residential communities, schools, dormitories, and enterprise campuses, as well as outdoor places that have high demands for wireless access, such as pedestrian malls.

Recommended power on antenna ports in an indoor distributed WLAN system
In an indoor distributed WLAN system, the recommended power for antenna ports is 8�?5 dBm. The power of 8 dBm ensures over �?0 dBm signal strength within 30 m if signals are not blocked by obstacles. The power of 15 dBm ensures over �?0 dBm signal strength within 20 m if signals pass through a brick wall. Note that the preceding recommendations are only applicable to the AP6310SN.

Differences between IPSG and DAI of S series switches
For S series switches, both IP Source Guard (IPSG) and Dynamic ARP Inspection (DAI) use binding tables (static binding table or DHCP snooping binding table) to filter packets. �?IPSG filters IP packets by using binding tables. A switch matches IP packets received by interfaces against binding entries, and forwards the packets matching the binding entries. - DAI filters ARP packets by using binding tables. A switch matches ARP packets received by interfaces against binding entries, and forwards the ARP packets matching the binding entries. - IPSG prevents IP address spoofing attacks. For example, a malicious host steals an authorized host's IP address to access the network or initiate attacks. - DAI can prevent man-in-the-middle attacks. Man-in-the-middle attacks are generally initiated through ARP spoofing. That is, the attacker leads traffic to itself to intercept other hosts' information. - IPSG cannot prevent address conflicts. For example, when a malicious host steals an online host's IP address, the ARP request packets sent by the malicious host will be sent to the online host through broadcast, causing an address conflict. To prevent IP address conflicts, you can configure both IPSG and DAI. - IPSG and DAI resolve different issues and meet different requirements. To ensure network security, you can configure both of them.

What is the recommended power on antenna interfaces in an indoor wireless distribution system
The recommended power for an antenna interface is 8-15 dBm. A power of 8 dBm ensures an over -70 dBm signal strength within 30 m if signals are not blocked by obstacles. A power of 15 dBm ensures an over -70 dBm signal strength within 20 m after signals pass through a brick wall. NOTE: The recommendation applies only to the AP6310SN.

Loopback detection usage scenario of S series switch
S series switches (except S1700) can detect self-loops on an interface, loops on the downstream network, and loops between interfaces. 1. Detect self-loops on an interface. During network deployment, Tx-Rx (fiber transmit end and fiber receive end) self-loops often occur on interfaces. For example, Tx-Rx self-loops often occur when the fiber is inserted incorrectly or the local interface is damaged by high voltage. A self-loop occurs on the interface of the Switch; as a result, packets sent by the interface are sent back to this interface. This may cause problems such as abnormal traffic forwarding and MAC address flapping. 2. A loop occurs on the downstream network or device of the Switch. As a result, packets sent by Interface1 are sent back to this interface after passing through the downstream network or device of the Switch. 3. A loop occurs on the network or between interfaces of the Switch. As a result, packets sent by Interface1 are sent back to Interface2.

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