Differences between an NNI optical port and an isolated node

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Question:
What is an NNI optical port and an isolated node? Can a non-transmission device be regarded as an isolated node?
Answer:
The NNI optical port is used for communication with external networks. For example, if a Huawei device is interconnected with a device of another company, or a service traverses multiple subnets but the T2000 can manage only a part of the subnets, the T2000 only identifies that a service is transmitted out from a certain slot of an NE. In this case, you need to create an NNI optical port as an identifier. A TM without protection or an isolated node without optical fiber connections can be created as an NNI optical port. An NNI optical port is a logical system that does not belong to any protection subnet and has no protection TM. An isolated node is configured on the NE side but cannot form or has not yet formed a protection subnet with other nodes.

Other related questions:
What are the differences between port isolation and ACL on a WLAN device
For WLAN devices: The port isolation function isolates interfaces in a VLAN, providing secure and flexible networking solutions. To implement Layer 2 isolation between interfaces, you can add these interfaces to different VLANs. However, this approach wastes VLAN resources. Port isolation can isolate interfaces in the same VLAN, and a port isolation group can effectively implement Layer 2 isolation between these interfaces. Port isolation offers secure and flexible networking solutions. An ACL is a packet filter that filters packets based on rules. A device with an ACL configured matches packets based on the rules to obtain the packets of a certain type, and then decides to forward or discard these packets according to the policies used by the service module to which the ACL is applied. Uncontrolled mutual access between different network segments brings security risks. After an ACL is applied to a QoS traffic policy or simplified traffic policy, the access rights between the users on different network segments are restricted.

Difference between port isolation and ACLs on S series switches
For S series switches (except S1700 switches): The port isolation function isolates interfaces in a VLAN, providing secure and flexible networking solutions. To implement Layer 2 isolation between interfaces, you can add each interface to a different VLAN. This method, however, wastes VLAN resources. Port isolation can isolate interfaces in the same VLAN, and a port isolation group can effectively implement Layer 2 isolation between these interfaces. It provides secure and flexible networking solutions. An ACL is a packet filter that filters packets based on rules. A switch with an ACL configured matches packets based on the rules to obtain the packets of a certain type, and then decides to forward or discard these packets according to the policies used by the service module to which the ACL is applied. For example, after an ACL is applied to a traffic policy or simplified traffic policy, access rights of the users on different network segments are restricted, preventing security risks caused by uncontrolled mutual access between different network segments.

How to choose between MFF and port isolation
Port isolation and MFF have similar effects. You can choose one according to your needs. The differences between port isolation and MFF are as follows: 1. Port isolation is configured on interfaces, while MFF is configured in VLANs. 2. Port isolation physically separates interfaces, and users may be not allowed to communicate with each other. MFF ensures that users can communicate through Layer 3. 3. Port isolation is applied to users on one device, while MFF can be applied to users on different devices as long as the users are in the same VLAN. 4. Port isolation is valid to all Ethernet packets, while MFF is only valid to IP packets. 5. The VLANIF interfaces can be configured for the VLANs on the interfaces with port isolation configured. The VLANs with MFF enabled cannot have VLANIF interfaces.

Optical power difference between the IN port of the D40 board and the OUT/MON port of the M40 board
The MON port of M40 board has 10 dB lower optical power than the IN port of the D40 board and the OUT port of the M40V board. The split ratio between the MON port and OUT port and that between the MON port and IN port are both 10:90. In other words, the optical power of the MON port is 10 dB lower than that of the IN port. The calculation formula is as follows: Optical power (dBm) of the IN port �?Optical power (dBm) of the MON port = 10 x lg(90/10) = 10 dB.

Difference between optical and electrical regeneration modes
Electrical regeneration mode: In earlier versions before the optical regeneration mode is introduced, only the electrical regeneration mode is used. Optical regeneration mode: This mode is introduced to achieve OCh-level E2E management for ASON services when the ASON services traverse regeneration boards. This mode also applies to the management scenario where two ASON LSPs are available when ASON services traverse regeneration boards in earlier versions. In both modes, service signal processing is the same. The differences between the two modes are as follows: 1. The trail management modes on the NMS are different. In electrical regeneration mode, OCh trails on the NMS cannot pass through and four independent OCh trails are formed. In optical regeneration mode, OCh trails on the NMS can pass through to form two E2E OCh trails, which facilitates management. 2. The optical regeneration mode is introduced in ASON trail management, with the purpose to enhance optical-layer trail maintainability. When optical-layer ASON is enabled, the optical regeneration mode must be used. Due to historical reasons, the electrical regeneration mode is always retained after the optical regeneration mode is proposed. The two modes have almost the same implementation mode and performance on the NE software.

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