Which should I prefer to enhance reliability of S series switches, stacking or VRRP

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For S series switches (except the S1700), stacking technology combines multiple stacking-capable switches into one logical switch. After switches set up a stack, upstream and downstream devices consider them as one switch. Stacking technology provides high network reliability and forwarding performance, while simplifying network management. It has the following advantages:
- High reliability Member switches in a stack work in redundancy mode. Link redundancy can also be implemented between member switches through inter-device link aggregation.
- High scalabilityYou can increase ports, bandwidth, and processing capacity of a stack by simply adding member switches to the stack. Member switches can join or leave the stack without affecting other member switches. New switches automatically synchronize the configuration file and system software version with the master switch.
- Simplified configuration and management You can log in to a stack from any member switch to manage and configure all the member switches in a stack. In addition, complicated Layer 2 ring protection protocols or Layer 3 protection switching protocols are not required after switches set up a stack; therefore, the network configuration is simplified.

Virtual Router Redundancy Protocol (VRRP) virtualizes multiple routing devices into one logical routing device and uses the IP address of the logical routing device as the default gateway address of users to implement communication with external networks. If the gateway fails, VRRP elects a new gateway to transmit data traffic, ensuring network reliability. On a multicast or broadcast LAN (for example, an Ethernet), VRRP ensures that high-reliability default links can be provided if the gateway fails. VRRP prevents network interruption caused by a single link failure without modification in configurations of the gateway or host.
Select stacking or VRRP based on actual networking requirements.

Other related questions:
Advantages of stacks of S series fixed switches
Stacking technology provides high network reliability and forwarding performance while simplifying network management. It has the following advantages: 1. High reliability: Member switches in a stack work in redundancy mode. Link redundancy can also be implemented between member switches through inter-device link aggregation. 2. High scalability: You can increase ports, bandwidth, and processing capacity of a stack by simply adding member switches to the stack. Member switches can join or leave the stack without affecting other member switches. New switches automatically synchronize the configuration file and system software version with the master switch. 3. Simpler configuration and management: You can log in to a stack from any member switch to manage and configure all the member switches in the stack. In addition, complicated Layer 2 ring protection protocols or Layer 3 protection switching protocols are not required after switches set up a stack; therefore, the network configuration is much simpler.

Whether an S series switch supports VRRP
S600-E series switches do not support VRRP. The following lists S series switch product support for VRRP excluding S1700: - S1720: Not supported by S1720GFR; supported by S1720GW-E and S1720GWR-E - S2700: Not supported. - S3700: Not supported by SI series; supported by EI and HI series - S5700: Not supported by SI series; supported by S5720-LI and S5720S-LI, but not supported by other LI series; supported by EI and HI series - S6700: Supported - S7700: Supported - S9700: Supported - S9300: Supported - S12700: Supported

Clusters or stacks of S series switches
A stack or cluster of S series switches is a logical switch consisting of multiple stacking-capable or clustering-capable S series switches. In V200R001C00 and earlier versions, S series switches only set up stacks. In later versions, S series fixed switches set up stacks, and S series modular switches set up clusters. Please ask questions about specific switch models. The following information is possibly related to your question:

Routing protocol preference on S series switches
Preference of routing protocols Different routing protocols, including the static routing protocol may discover different routes to the same destination, but not all these routes are optimal. At a certain moment, only one routing protocol determines the preferred route to a certain destination. To select the optimal route, routes of these routing protocols including the static route are configured with preferences. When multiple sources of routing information exist, the route learned by the routing protocol with the highest preference (a smaller value indicates a higher preference) becomes the optimal route. The optimal route is then saved to the local routing table. Routers define the external preference and internal preference. External preferences are manually configured for routing protocols. The following lists the default external preferences of routing protocols: - Direct: 0 - OSPF: 10 - IS-IS: 15 - Static: 60 - RIP: 100 - OSPF ASE: 150 - OSPF NSSA: 150 - IBGP: 255 - EBGP: 255 Note: Value 0 indicates direct routes and value 255 indicates routes learned from unreliable sources. A smaller value indicates a higher preference. Except for direct routes, the priorities of routing protocols can be manually configured. In addition, the preference of each static route varies. Internal preferences of routing protocols cannot be manually configured. The following lists the internal preferences of routing protocols: - Direct: 0 - OSPF: 10 - IS-IS Level-1: 15 - IS-IS Level-2: 18 - Static: 60 - RIP: 100 - OSPF ASE: 150 - OSPF NSSA: 150 - IBGP: 200 - EBGP: 20 During route selection, a router first compares the external preferences of routes. When the same external preference is set for different routing protocols, the router selects the optimal route based on the internal preference. For example, two routes (an OSPF route and a static route) are available. Both routes can reach the destination 10.1.1.0/24, and the preferences of the two routes are set to 5. In this case, the router determines the optimal route according to the internal preferences. The internal preference (the value is 10) of OSPF is higher than that (the value is 60) of the static route. Therefore, the router selects the route discovered by OSPF as the optimal route.

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