Traffic classification in the QoS function of the USG6000 series

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There are two traffic classification methods: behavior aggregate (BA) classification and MF classification.
�?BA classification
�?MF classification

Other related questions:
MF classification in the QoS function of the USG6000 series
In MF classification, packets are classified elaborately based on complex rules, for example, based on the source address or destination address of IPv4 or IPv6 packets, the protocol type, or the TCP/UDP port numbers of applications. MF classification is usually performed on the border device in the Diff-Serv model.

BA classification in the QoS function of the USG6000 series
In BA classification, packets are classified roughly based on simple rules, for example, based on DSCP values of IPv4 packets or 802.1p values of virtual local area network (VLAN) packets. Packets with the same priority or service level are called BA. BA classification is usually performed on the core device in the Diff-Serv model.

Traffic shaping in the QoS function of the USG6000 series
Traffic shaping aims to limit the normal traffic and burst traffic of a connection that flow out of a network so that packets can be forwarded at an even speed. Traffic shaping is a type of measure for actively adjusting the outgoing traffic rate.

Differences between traffic shaping and traffic policing in the QoS function of the USG6000 series
Traffic shaping differs from traffic policing in the following aspects: �?Traffic shaping involves caching packets that exceed the traffic specifications in traffic policing. Cached packets are forwarded when there are sufficient tokens in the token bucket. �?Traffic shaping may increase the delay whereas traffic policing does not.

Tail drop in the QoS function of the USG6000 series
Tail drop After a queue is full, the packet that arrives last is discarded.

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