Meaning of the threat map for the USG6000 series

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The threat map displays global threat distribution with details, including distribution and attack details of the attack source and destination regions.

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Content of the threat map for the USG6000 series
The threat map displays global threat distribution with details, including distribution and attack details of the attack source and destination regions.

Meaning of the traffic map for the USG6000 series
The traffic map displays global traffic distribution with details, such as traffic rankings, volume, directions, and source and destination IP addresses.

Meaning of the server mapping on the USG6000
The server mapping is classified into static mapping and server load balancing. The static mapping is a type of one-to-one mapping, that is, a public IP address corresponds to an intranet server. The server load balancing is a type of one-to-many mapping. It can distribute traffic generated by external network users for accessing the intranet servers among specific intranet servers based on a certain algorithm.

Whether the USG6000 series supports threat logs
The USG6000 series allows you to view threat logs on the web UI. By checking threat logs, you can view detection and defense records for network threats such as antivirus, intrusion prevention, DDoS, botnets, Trojan horses, and worms, learn historical and ongoing threat events, and adjust security policies or implement active defense in a timely manner. The USG is deployed between the Internet and the network to be protected. Threat logs are generated when the USG detects viruses, threats, botnets, Trojan horses, worms, or attacks in traffic. Do as follows to view traffic logs on the web UI: 1. Choose Monitor > Log > Threat Log to view threat logs. 2. Choose Customize and select/deselect conditions for threat log display. 3. Click Export to export threat logs in CSV format to the management PC. (Only devices with hard disks support this step.)

Meaning of port mirroring for the USG6000 series
To locate network problems by capturing and analyzing session packets without interrupting services, you should configure port mirroring. Port mirroring copies packets on the specified service interface to a non-service interface. When a session is abnormal, you can locate the fault by viewing the protocol analyzer connected to the non-service interface without affecting services. The service interface is known as the mirroring port and the non-service interface known as the observing port.

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