Which aging modes does an SA support

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A security association (SA) supports the following types of lifetimes:

-The time-based lifetime: the period of time an SA can exist after it is established.
-The traffic-based lifetime: the maximum traffic volume that an SA can process.

When the specified time or traffic volume is reached, the SA becomes invalid. When the SA is about to expire, IKE will negotiate a new SA for IPSec. In this manner, a new SA is established when the old SA becomes invalid. Before the new SA is established, the two ends use the old SA to protect data flows. When the new SA is established, the two ends immediately use the new SA.

Other related questions:
Which aging modes does an SA support
A security association (SA) supports the following types of lifetimes: -The time-based lifetime: the period of time an SA can exist after it is established. -The traffic-based lifetime: the maximum traffic volume that an SA can process. When the specified time or traffic volume is reached, the SA becomes invalid. When the SA is about to expire, IKE will negotiate a new SA for IPSec. In this manner, a new SA is established when the old SA becomes invalid. Before the new SA is established, the two ends use the old SA to protect data flows. When the new SA is established, the two ends immediately use the new SA.

How are SAs aged on an AR
AR routers can age SAs in two ways: - The time-based lifetime indicates the period of time an SA can exist since it is established. - The traffic-based lifetime indicates the maximum traffic volume that an SA can process. When the specified time or traffic volume is reached, the SA becomes invalid. When the SA is about to expire, IKE will negotiate a new SA. In this manner, a new SA is established when the old SA becomes invalid. Before the new SA is established, the two ends use the old SA to protect data flows. When the new SA is established, the two ends immediately use the new SA.

Which upgrade modes does an AP support
Currently, an AP can be upgraded using the AC, FTP, or SFTP. - AC loading: The target version file of the AP is saved on the AC. During loading, the AC sends the target version file to the AP using CAPWAP. - FTP loading: The target version file of the AP is saved on the FTP server. During loading, the AP logs in to the FTP server and obtains the target version file. - SFTP loading: The target version file of the AP is saved on the SFTP server. During loading, the AP logs in to the SFTP server and obtains the target version file. For information about how to configure AP upgrade modes, see "How do I configure an AP's upgrade mode."

Which Forwarding Modes Does ELB Support?

ELB supports the following forwarding modes:

  • Round robin: sends requests to backend ECSs in polling mode. This forwarding rule applies to short-connection services, such as the HTTP service.
  • Least connections: preferentially sends requests to the backend ECS with the least connections. This forwarding rule applies to long-connection services, such as the database service.
  • Source IP address: calculates the hash value of the request source IP address and sends requests to a matched ECS. This forwarding rule ensures that requests initiated from the same source IP addresses are sent to a fixed ECS. This rule applies to TCP connections of load balancers that do not use cookies.

What are the differences between AP restart modes and what are their application scenarios
You can restart an AP in the following ways: run the reset command on the AC, log in to the AP and restart it, hold down the RESET button on the AP, and power off and on the AP. The differences and application scenarios of these restart modes are as follows: - Run the reset command on the AC: Run the ap-reset { all | id ap-id | ap-type { type ap-type | type-id type-id } } command in the WLAN view to restart a specified AP or APs in batches. This command applies only to online APs. - Log in to the AP and restart it: Log in to the AP and run the reboot command in the user view to restart the AP. You can restart an AP using this method only after you log in to the AP using Telnet or through the console port. This method is used to restart APs that are not online on the AC. You can connect a PC to the wired interface of the AP and log in to the AP using Telnet. - Hold down the RESET button on the AP: Using this method, you can restart an AP without the need to get the AP online or log in to the AP. - Power off and on the AP: If the AP uses PoE power supply, run the undo poe enable and poe enable commands in the interface view of the power sourcing equipment (PSE) to restart the AP.

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