Describe AR series routers

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AR series enterprise router (AR for short) is a new-generation service routing gateway that integrates routing, switching, radio access, voice, and security functions. AR routers include the following series: AR120, AR150, AR160, AR200, AR500, AR510, AR1200, AR2200, AR3200, and AR3600.
For details about models included in each series, see the following URLs: Hardware Query Too, or Hardware description.

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Describe AR series routers
AR series enterprise router (AR for short) is a new-generation service routing gateway that integrates routing, switching, radio access, voice, and security functions. AR routers include the following series: AR120, AR150, AR160, AR200, AR500, AR510, AR1200, AR2200, AR3200, and AR3600. For details about models included in each series, see the following URLs: Hardware Query Too, or Hardware description.

Introduction to WLAN security of AR routers
WLAN security is as follows: User access security: Link authentication, access authentication, and data encryption are used to ensure validity and security of user access on wireless networks. Service security: This feature protects service data of authorized users from being intercepted by unauthorized users during transmission. For details, see WLAN Security Configuration > Overview .

How to configure remote traffic mirroring on AR series routers
Remote traffic mirroring is only supported in V200R005C32 and earlier versions. By configuring remote traffic mirroring, you can replicate specific packets transmitted through an interface to remote monitoring devices for analysis and surveillance. Before configuring remote traffic mirroring, ensure that the routing protocol and GRE tunnels are configured. 1. Configure the remote observing server. Procedure Run the system-view command to enter the system view. Run the observe-server destination-ip destination-ip-address source-ip source-ip-address [ dscp dscp-value ] command to configure the observing server in remote traffic mirroring. Note: The destination-ip-address parameter indicates the IP address of the monitoring device. The source-ip-address parameter indicates the IP address of the mirroring interface. If the IP addresses of the monitoring device and the mirroring interface are private IP addresses, GRE tunnels must be configured first to ensure the interworking between private IP addresses on public networks. 2. Configure traffic mirroring. Background In traffic mirroring, the mirroring interface applies a traffic policy that includes traffic mirroring behavior. Packets that are transmitted through the interface and match the traffic classification rules are replicated to the observing interface. Procedure a. Configure the traffic classifier. Run the system-view command to enter the system view. Run the traffic classifier classifier-name [ operator { and | or } ] command to create a traffic classifier and enter the view of the traffic classifier. Run the if-match command to configure the matching rule of the traffic classifier. Run the quit command to quit the view of the traffic classifier. b. Configure the traffic behavior. Run the traffic behavior behavior-name command to create traffic behavior and enter the view of the traffic behavior. Run the mirror to observe-port command to mirror traffic that matches the rule to the specified observing interface. Run the quit command to quit the view of the traffic behavior. Run the quit command to quit the system view. c. Configure the traffic policy. Run the system-view command to enter the system view. Run the traffic policy policy-name command to create a traffic policy and enter the view of the traffic policy, or directly enter the view of an existing traffic policy. Run the classifier classifier-name behavior behavior-name command to configure the traffic behavior of specified traffic classifiers in the traffic policy, that is, bind the traffic behavior to the specified traffic classifier. Run the quit command to quit the view of the traffic policy. Run the quit command to quit the system view. d. Apply the traffic policy. Run the system-view command to enter the system view. Run the interface interface-type interface-number [.subinterface-number ] command to enter the interface view. Run the traffic-policy policy-name { inbound | outbound } to apply the traffic policy in the inbound or outbound direction of the interface.

How to configure local traffic mirroring on AR series routers
By configuring local traffic mirroring, you can replicate specific packets transmitted through an interface to local monitoring devices for analysis and surveillance. Prerequisites Before configuring local traffic mirroring, ensure that the link protocol state of the interface is Up. 1. Configure the local observing interface. Background In local traffic mirroring, monitoring devices are directly connected to the observing interface. It is recommended that other configurations should not be performed on an interface that is configured as the observing interface to prevent its mirroring function from being affected: - If not only the mirroring packets but also the packets of other services are transmitted through the observing interface, the source of the packets cannot be distinguished. - If traffic congests on the observing interface, mirroring packets may be discarded because the priority of the mirroring packets is lower. Procedure Run the system-view command to enter the system view. Run the observe-port interface interface-type interface-number command to configure the local observing interface. 2. Configure traffic mirroring. Background In traffic mirroring, the mirroring interface applies a traffic policy that includes traffic mirroring behavior. Packets that are transmitted through the interface and match the traffic classification rules are replicated to the observing interface. Procedure a. Configure the traffic classifier. Run the system-view command to enter the system view. Run the traffic classifier classifier-name [ operator { and | or } ] command to create a traffic classifier and enter the view of the traffic classifier. Run the if-match command to configure the matching rule of the traffic classifier based on actual requirements. Run the quit command to quit the view of the traffic classifier. b. Configure the traffic behavior. Run the traffic behavior behavior-name command to create traffic behavior and enter the view of the traffic behavior. Run the mirror to observe-port command to mirror traffic that matches the rule to the specified observing interface. Run the quit command to quit the view of the traffic behavior. Run the quit command to quit the system view. c. Configure the traffic policy. Run the system-view command to enter the system view. Run the traffic policy policy-name command to create a traffic policy and enter the view of the traffic policy, or directly enter the view of an existing traffic policy. Run the classifier classifier-name behavior behavior-name command to configure the traffic behavior of specified traffic classifiers in the traffic policy, that is, bind the traffic behavior to the specified traffic classifier. Run the quit command to quit the view of the traffic policy. Run the quit command to quit the system view. d. Apply the traffic policy. Run the system-view command to enter the system view. Run the interface interface-type interface-number [.subinterface-number ] command to enter the interface view. Run the traffic-policy policy-name { inbound | outbound } to apply the traffic policy in the inbound or outbound direction of the interface.

WLAN support on the AR router
Definition: A wireless local area network (WLAN) is a network that uses wireless channels such as radio waves, laser, and infrared rays to replace the transmission media used on a wired LAN.WLAN technology described in this document is implemented based on 802.11 standards. That is, a WLAN is a network that uses high-frequency signals (for example, 2.4 GHz or 5 GHz signals) as transmission media. 802.11 was originally a wireless LAN communications standard defined by the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) in 1997. The IEEE then made amendments to the standard, forming the 802.11 family, including 802.11, 802.11a, 802.11b, 802.11e, 802.11g, 802.11i, and 802.11n. Purpose: Wired LANs use wired cables or optical fibers as transmission media, which are expensive and have fixed locations. As people have increasing requirements on network mobility, wired LANs cannot meet these requirements. WLAN technology is then developed. Currently, WLAN has become a cost-efficient network access mode. WLAN technology allows you to easily access a wireless network and move around within the coverage of the wireless network. Benefit: - High network mobility: WLANs can be connected easily, which is not limited by cable and port positions. WLANs especially apply to scenarios such as office buildings, airport halls, resorts, hotels, stadiums, and cafes. - Flexible network deployment: WLANs can provide wireless network coverage in places where cables are difficult to deploy, such as subways and highways. This solution reduces cables, offers ease of implementation at a low cost, and has high scalability. For details, see WLAN-AC Configuration Guide .

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