Function of a target

1

An initiator can be considered as a port on a host, and a target can be considered as a port on a storage array. An initiator initiates a connection, and a target is connected.
If a host needs to access LUNs on a storage array, the initiator is on the host side, and the target is on the storage array side.
Similarly, if storage array A needs to take over storage array B from another vendor, storage array A will access LUNs on storage array B. The port on storage array A is the initiator, and the port on storage array B is the target.

Other related questions:
Types of target coverage areas on WLANs
WLANs can provide wireless coverage in the following target areas: - Major coverage areas: places where many users need to access the Internet, such as dormitories, libraries, classrooms, hotel lobbies and guest rooms, meeting rooms, offices, and exhibition halls - Minor coverage areas: places where few users need to access the Internet, such as washrooms, stairways, lifts, corridors, and kitchens - Special coverage areas: places where WLAN access of users is allowed or prohibited

How to prevent ARP attacks targeted at static users
Static users (for example, dumb terminals such as printers and servers) are allocated static IP addresses. Attackers usually steal authorized users' IP addresses to connect to networks and initiate ARP attacks to interrupt network communication. To defend against ARP attacks, a static user binding table and dynamic ARP inspection (DAI) can be configured for static users. DAI checks ARP packets based on binding entries. Run the user-bind static command to configure the static user binding table, and run the arp anti-attack check user-bind enable command to enable DAI. After the configuration, when a device receives an ARP packet, it compares the source IP address, source MAC address, interface number, and VLAN ID of the ARP packet with static binding entries. If the ARP packet matches a binding entry, the device considers the ARP packet valid and allows the packet to pass through. If the ARP packet does not match a binding entry, the device considers the ARP packet invalid and discards the packet.

How many types of target coverage areas are there on WLANs? What are field strength requirements in these areas
WLAN networks involve the following target coverage areas: - Major coverage areas: places where many users need to connect to the Internet, such as dormitories, libraries, classrooms, hotel lobbies and guest rooms, meeting rooms, offices, and exhibition halls. - Minor coverage areas: places where few users need to connect to the Internet, such as bathrooms, stairways, lifts, corridors, and kitchens. - Special coverage areas: special areas where users allow or prohibit WLAN access. Depending on WLAN access requirements in the preceding areas, various field strengths must meet the following requirements: - Hotspot field strength: The field strength in major coverage areas ranges from -40 dBm to -65 dBm. A field strength higher than -40 dBm may cause receiver overload, and a field strength lower than -65 dBm may reduce the network connection rate. - Edge field strength: It is determined based on the receiving sensitivity and edge bandwidth. Generally, the edge field strength should be higher than -75 dBm. The network connection rate in minor areas can be lower than that in major areas. - Interference field strength: The co-channel interference strength in an area cannot exceed -80 dBm. - Leakage field strength: The leakage field strength 10 m away from a building cannot exceed -90 dBm.

Method used to adjust the working mode of the RAU board to the target value
If the RAU board is not in the gain locking mode before the commissioning, it automatically changes to the gain locking mode during the commissioning. After the commissioning is complete, if the gain of the RAU board cannot compensate for the line attenuation, you need to manually change the working mode of the RAU board to the maximum gain mode or the power locking mode. Then, manually adjust the optical power of the RAU board and that of the optical amplifier behind the RAU board to meet the system optical power requirement.

If you have more questions, you can seek help from following ways:
To iKnow To Live Chat
Scroll to top